Creativity in teaching and learning is vital

I firmly believe in inspiring students to be inquisitive and curious in order to develop their creative potential, which in turn leads to the development of good lateral thinking and problem solving skills. I found the following article about creativity in schools very interesting.

Creativity in schools sounds good – so what’s the hitch? by Anne Harris, Senior Lecturer, Creative Arts Education at Monash University.

via Blending aquieterstorm.tumblr.com

curiouser and curiouser … Image via Blending
aquieterstorm.tumblr.com

 

 

 

Storytelling from images

Retina_Day_320365_Photographer_Marius-Vieth

Retina | Day 320365. Photographer: Marius-Vieth

Image source

Images are a great way to promote creative thinking. Find a collection of interesting images relating to a theme and then ask your students to study them, choose one or more of them, and then write a short story about what they think might be happening to the characters in them.

If you have chosen interesting images to start with the students may surprise you in their interpretations. You can then use their stories to promote meaningful discussions relating to your specific subject or workplace situation.

If you are prepared to be adventurous, don’t choose images that are targeted to a specific learning outcome or skill. To get the best results choose a theme that has no evident connection with your subject. This may sound frivolous, but if you really want to engage your students in a creative way give it a go.

As an example, look at these images:  http://www.tumblr.com/tagged/street-photography

Resulting stories from these images may revolve around:

  • appearances can be deceiving
  • some things can be overlooked
  • what’s in the detail is important
  • big versus small

Your challenge would then be to direct any resulting discussion from the students’ stories/themes back to the workplace or current subject area you are dealing with.

POSTSCRIPT: the images on this url change regularly, so what you see today may not be there next week – but the new ones will be equally interesting.

Beautiful camouflage

I always loved using camouflage as a theme when teaching art because it generated such a different way of seeing and thinking. I found it often inspired students to think more creatively. Artists have embraced the concept of camouflage in may varied and beautiful ways. I have chosen a few examples that visually inspire me as an artist, but the theme can be useful for any area of study that requires creative and innovative thinking.

Art Wolfe-Impala in brush

Art Wolfe – Impala in brush

Camouflage dog

Dog camouflage

Body Painting-by Cecilia-Paredes

Body Painting-by Cecilia-Paredes

Body Painting-by Cecilia-Paredes

Body Painting-by Cecilia-Paredes

Body Painting-by Cecilia-Paredes

Body Painting-by Cecilia-Paredes

clouds

Clouds

Emily Hadden

Emily Hadden – shirt

Emma Hack 1

Body painting by Emma Hack

Body painting by Emma Hack

Body painting by Emma Hack

Body painting by Emma Hack

Body painting by Emma Hack

Floral floral

Floral overlay

gloves

Black and white is always impressive

hand book

hand book

Rene Magritte National Gallery of Art Washington DC

Rene Magritte National Gallery of Art Washington DC

Steven Meisel

Artist – Steven Meisel

Street Art

Street Art – artist unknown

Tree hotel Sweden

Tree hotel Sweden

Photo by Valerie Belin

Photo by Valerie Belin

Indian bridal henna

Indian bridal henna

Photographer- Renee Keith

Photographer- Renee Keith

all images via

I particularly love the work of Emma Hack and Cecilia Paredes.

Emma Hack is an Australian artist. Her recent collection of work was inspired by Verushka who in the 1960s and 70s painted herself into rustic walls and naturalistic settings. Emma’s first ever human body art wallpaper camouflage took 19 hours to paint.

Cecilia Paredes was born in Lima, Peru, and currently lives and works between San Jose, Costa Rica and Philadelphia. Her artistic career began as a painter but her creative concepts evolved, revealing themselves first in three-dimensional objects, then through photography. Paredes paints her own body to blend in with the background.

What’s in a brief?

I’ve just been reading a blog by Krishna http://nairkrishna.wordpress.com and am impressed with this statement that appears on it:

“We see what we expect to see. What we know, or think we know, influences us so strongly that we
 are often blind to change, to new 
views and new opportunities. This 
is true in all aspects of life.

The challenge is to see and learn
 everything around us with fresh eyes.”

I love it!

I’ve been thinking about the way I interact with clients who find it hard to articulate what they want when it comes to a visual design brief. Don’t get me wrong, I think it’s great that they don’t have a literal concept in mind – no designer wants to be ‘the pencil’ for someone else’s visual concept, but I do need a brief to help me meet their expectations. However, I also want enough latitude so I can provide concepts that allow the client to “see and learn with fresh eyes”.

I have a wonderful client who willingly embraces the opportunity to see and learn with fresh eyes and who trusts me with total creative freedom. Her briefs are usually something like this:

Client: “I want some images to work as inspiration for some yet to be developed courses that will be aimed at people of different ages, experience and background”

What a wonderfully ‘open’ brief, but I need to get a narrower perspective. I don’t want to set any pre-conceived notions so I try to get more information by asking the client to describe her big-picture thoughts through abstract terms such as emotions, colours, style, relationships and metaphors; eg “if this project could be described as an animal what sort would it be?” “what colours do you spontaneously think of when you think about this project”,  “give me 10 key words that immediately come to mind when you think about this project”, “what’s the main effect and outcome you want”, “what don’t you want” (usually clients are quite clear about this one).

My client really appreciates this approach and from it has evolved a really good working relationship.

Here are some images that I created for such a project. These images were used to inspire creative course titles and content in the early development stages of a learning program, and were then used in a successful marketing campaign for that program.

Revealing the inner self

Revealing the inner self © Bev Puckridge

Fisher in the ocean of opportunity

Fisher in the ocean of opportunity © Bev Puckridge

The voyage of dreams © Bev Puckridge

The voyage of dreams © Bev Puckridge

Flightpath  © Bev Puckridge

Flightpath © Bev Puckridge