Creativity in teaching and learning is vital

I firmly believe in inspiring students to be inquisitive and curious in order to develop their creative potential, which in turn leads to the development of good lateral thinking and problem solving skills. I found the following article about creativity in schools very interesting.

Creativity in schools sounds good – so what’s the hitch? by Anne Harris, Senior Lecturer, Creative Arts Education at Monash University.

via Blending aquieterstorm.tumblr.com

curiouser and curiouser … Image via Blending
aquieterstorm.tumblr.com

 

 

 

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Attention to details

Looking at the finer details of objects provides a new perspective and appreciation of their design, colour, texture and form. Here’s a few images that have inspired me.

 

Storytelling from images

Retina_Day_320365_Photographer_Marius-Vieth

Retina | Day 320365. Photographer: Marius-Vieth

Image source

Images are a great way to promote creative thinking. Find a collection of interesting images relating to a theme and then ask your students to study them, choose one or more of them, and then write a short story about what they think might be happening to the characters in them.

If you have chosen interesting images to start with the students may surprise you in their interpretations. You can then use their stories to promote meaningful discussions relating to your specific subject or workplace situation.

If you are prepared to be adventurous, don’t choose images that are targeted to a specific learning outcome or skill. To get the best results choose a theme that has no evident connection with your subject. This may sound frivolous, but if you really want to engage your students in a creative way give it a go.

As an example, look at these images:  http://www.tumblr.com/tagged/street-photography

Resulting stories from these images may revolve around:

  • appearances can be deceiving
  • some things can be overlooked
  • what’s in the detail is important
  • big versus small

Your challenge would then be to direct any resulting discussion from the students’ stories/themes back to the workplace or current subject area you are dealing with.

POSTSCRIPT: the images on this url change regularly, so what you see today may not be there next week – but the new ones will be equally interesting.

Colour Moods

I love colour, most of all when a group of colours work together to create a certain mood or ambience. Sometimes I need a colour palette that jumps boldly out and says “Look at me … I am fabulous!” Other times I need a colour palette that is less demanding, but still appealing, interesting and mood setting. How do I go about creating colour palettes for different needs?

Colour palette inspiration is all around us; we just need to look at our environment – both natural and man-made to find beautiful colour combinations that we can utilise for different themes or purposes.  There are times for “look at me” colour palettes, and times for something less bravado.

Today I’m focusing on a subtle colour palette; one that can evoke a sense of sophistication and serenity. I don’t want “boring” but I do want “ethereal”, “calmness” and “cohesiveness”. I call this a “soft palette”. The images below display a broad range of hues, but a delicate range of tones.  They are drawn from a range of sources.

Artichoke palette

Artichoke palette

Beautiful geometry

Beautiful geometry

Eggs in nest

Eggs in nest

Eucalyptus leaves

Eucalyptus leaves

Faded colours

Faded colours

Fungi

Fungi

Glazed hues

Glazed hues

Ibaraki ceramics

Ibaraki ceramics

Tray of jasper trials, ca. 1773-76, from Josiah Wedgwood's manufacture.

Tray of jasper trials, ca. 1773-76, from Josiah Wedgwood’s manufacture.

Rusty stuff

Rusty stuff

Sea Glass

Sea Glass

Soft texture

Soft texture

Sunlit Poppies

Sunlit Poppies

Tea Rose sketch and palette

Tea Rose sketch and palette

Teabag bundles

Teabag bundles

Soft colours

Soft colours

Vintage gas cans

Vintage gas cans

All images via

Beautiful grids

” Once a grid is invented it may bend, crumble or shatter, but its organising principle never disappears” Hannah, H Higgins, The Grid Book.

The grid creates an underlying structure that is used in art, graphic design, structural design, architectural design, typography, packaging, websites, maps and databases. Grids are all around us; they can be organic, man-made, natural, distorted, 2D, 3D, simple and complex. Some designers now see the grid as a conservative organisational principle, however the beauty that emanates from its use cannot be denied.

By thinking creatively, educators can build many different learning experiences using the grid as a theme.

Here are a few images to illustrate the diversity, complexity and beauty that can be evoked from grids. 

edouard.decastro.name

Victor Vasarely
edouard.decastro.name

Varvara Stepanova-1920s

Varvara Stepanova-1920s

studiotwentysix2.com

Tom Davie | Grid Posters
studiotwentysix2.com

tommasosartori.com

Tommaso Sartori
tommasosartori.com

mimimatelot.blogspot.ca

Winter Sinking Strokes: Modern architecture of Tokyo
mimimatelot.blogspot.ca

by safa pirshiri

Light of Hope, Sheykh Lotf Allah Mosque
by safa pirshiri

apostrophe9.tumblr.com

Shadows
apostrophe9.tumblr.com

fastcodesign.com

RYUJI NAKAMURA, CORNFIELD: paper and glue.
fastcodesign.com

pineapple skin

Pineapple skin

origamitessellations.com

origamitessellations.com

imachination.net

Mosque of Herat, Afghanistan
imachination.net

extrendy.com

Morrocan Trade Bank by Norman Foster
extrendy.com

artistictile.com

artistictile.com

its-the-little-things-that-count.tumblr.com

its-the-little-things-that-count.tumblr.com

kokoromoi.com

kokoromoi.com

detail from ceiling of the main mosque in Rajah Bazaar

Detail from ceiling of the main mosque in Rajah Bazaar

UK-based studio random international

Interactive light installation
UK-based studio, Random International

moredesignplease.com

Indian hand-drawn patterns
moredesignplease.com

skysignal.tumblr.com

Hikikomori
skysignal.tumblr.com

tumblr.com

#floorstract #deco #interiors
tumblr.com

designspiration.net

designspiration.net

University of Oxford HAWKINS\BROWN

University of Oxford HAWKINS\BROWN

flickr.com

Bamboo
flickr.com

landscapelifescape.tumblr.com

Badshahi Mosque – Lahore – Pakistan
landscapelifescape.tumblr.com

mimimatelot.blogspot.ca

Winter Sinking Strokes: Modern architecture of Tokyo #architecture
mimimatelot.blogspot.ca

valscrapbook.tumblr.com

Alhambra
valscrapbook.tumblr.com

retaildesignblog.net

Alexander ceramic tile │Giles Miller Studio
retaildesignblog.net

alwayssparkle.tumblr.com

Al-Rifa’i Mosque Window
alwayssparkle.tumblr.com

thombeau.blogspot.com

Aerial views of the Dutch landscape by Gerco de Ruijter.
thombeau.blogspot.com

elemenop.tumblr.com

orange
elemenop.tumblr.com

ropegoogle.com

rope
google.com

socialbliss.com

browndresswithwhitedots.tumblr.com

browndresswithwhitedots.tumblr.com

Safavieh rugs paro gridsafavieh.com

Safavieh rugs paro grid
safavieh.com

All above images via

Shades of blue

I love colour saturated images. The beauty of any colour is enhanced through a subtle combination of its various hues. Here’s a range of cool blues that anyone would find hard to resist. I find colour and images like these inspirational.

artpropelled.tumblr.com

artpropelled.tumblr.com

loveliegreenie.tumblr.com

loveliegreenie.tumblr.com

Gur Emir Mausoleum, Samarkandzarzor.tumblr.com

Gur Emir Mausoleum, Samarkand
zarzor.tumblr.com

huamao.tumblr.com

huamao.tumblr.com

mixedplateblog.com

mixedplateblog.com

intense blue

Antonio Basso, Ibizaflickr.com

Antonio Basso, Ibiza
flickr.com

wishflowers.tumblr.com

wishflowers.tumblr.com

Blue, Matilda Bay, Australiabesttravelphotos.wordpress.com

Blue, Matilda Bay, Australia
besttravelphotos.wordpress.com

28.media.tumblr.com

28.media.tumblr.com

blue ceramic pattern

by laura.bellflickr.com

by laura.bell
flickr.com

baenk.com

baenk.com

Blue Footed Booby ~ Galapagos Islandsgoogle.com

Blue Footed Booby ~ Galapagos Islands
google.com

All above images via

Artists use colour to express emotions and moods. Here’s Head of Woman from Pablo Picasso’s Blue Period (1901–1904).

In the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

In the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York